Wednesday, January 28, 2015

Earth & Climate News -- ScienceDaily

Earth science research and news. Read science articles on air quality, geology, meteorology, oceanography, paleontology and science and the environment.
Earth & Climate News -- ScienceDaily
  1. Researchers produce two bio-fuels from a single algae
    A common algae commercially grown to make fish food holds promise as a source for both biodiesel and jet fuel, according to a new study.
  2. Erratic as normal: Arctic sea ice loss expected to be bumpy in the short term
    Arctic sea ice extent plunged precipitously from 2001 to 2007, then barely budged between 2007 and 2013. Even in a warming world, researchers should expect such unusual periods of no change -- and rapid change -- at the world's northern reaches, according to a new paper.
  3. Smothered oceans: Extreme oxygen loss in oceans accompanied past global climate change
    From the subarctic Pacific to the Chilean margins, extreme oxygen loss is stretching from the upper ocean to about 3,000 meters deep. In some oceanic regions, such loss occurred within 100 years or less, according to a new study.
  4. Storm Chasers Take on Supercell Thunderstorms in Bangladesh
    This past April, Scott Olson touched down in Bangladesh to become the country’s first known storm chaser. On the other side of the world, back in Oklahoma, meteorologists worked tirelessly to put together accurate forecasts to help Olson get into the thick of the country’s notoriously elusive thunderstorms.
  5. Missing link in metal physics explains Earth's magnetic field
    Earth's magnetic field shields the life on our planet's surface from cosmic rays. It is generated by turbulent motions of liquid iron in Earth's core. Iron is a metal, which means it can easily conduct a flow of electrons. New findings show that a missing piece of the traditional theory explaining why metals become less conductive when they are heated was needed to complete the puzzle of this field-generating process.
  6. Earlier menopause linked to everyday chemical exposures
    Women whose bodies have high levels of chemicals found in plastics, personal-care products, common household items and the environment experience menopause two to four years earlier than women with lower levels of these chemicals, according to a new study.
  7. Spiky 'hedgehog particles' for safer paints, fewer VOC emissions
    A new process that can sprout microscopic spikes on nearly any type of particle may lead to more environmentally friendly paints and a variety of other innovations.
  8. Nordic marine scientists: Showcasing growing pressure on oceans?
    A group of 13 scientists argue that the Nordic countries are in a unique position to showcase how to handle the growing pressure on the oceans. However, this relies on a collective ability to regard change as connected.
  9. Slope on ocean surface lowers sea level in Europe
    A ‘slope’ on the ocean surface in the Strait of Gibraltar is lowering the sea level in Europe by 7cm, researchers have discovered. This research will help to more accurately predict future sea levels by providing a more complete understanding of the factors that control it.
  10. A robot to help improve agriculture and wine production
    Agricultural researchers and computer scientists are working on the development of an unmanned robot, equipped with non-invasive advanced sensors and artificial intelligence systems, which will help manage vineyards. This robot will provide reliable, fast and objective information on the state of the vineyards to grapegrowers, such as vegetative development, water status, production and grape composition.