Sunday, June 26, 2016

Earth & Climate News -- ScienceDaily

Earth science research and news. Read science articles on air quality, geology, meteorology, oceanography, paleontology and science and the environment.
Earth & Climate News -- ScienceDaily
  1. Giant Blobs of Rock, Deep Inside the Earth, Hold Important Clues About Our Planet
    Two massive blob-like structures lie deep within the Earth, roughly on opposite sides of the planet. The two structures, each the size of a continent and 100 times taller than Mount Everest, sit on the core, 1,800 miles deep, and about halfway to the center of the Earth. Researchers suggest these blobs are made of something different from the rest of Earth's mantle, and are determined to figure out what that is.
  2. For nature, gravel-bed rivers most important feature in mountainous western North America
    Gravel-bed river floodplains are some of the most ecologically important habitats in North America, according to a new study by scientists from the US and Canada. Their research shows how broad valleys coming out of glaciated mountains provide highly productive and important habitat for a large diversity of aquatic, avian and terrestrial species.
  3. Computer models show park microclimates improve city life
    Computer modelling based on microclimate data from a Malaysian public park has shown how adding trees and grass can improve living conditions in dense city cores.
  4. Exhausting our green shipping options
    Scientists have developed a revolutionary emissions abatement system that removes pollutants from exhaust gas to help the international shipping industry meet ambitious emissions targets.
  5. What did Earth's ancient magnetic field look like?
    Earth's ancient magnetic field was significantly different than the present day field, originating from several poles rather than the familiar two, new research suggests. Then, shortly after our planet's core solidified, this work predicts that Earth's magnetic field transitioned to a 'strong,' two-pole one.
  6. Neonicotinoid pesticides cause harm to honeybees
    One possible cause of the alarming bee mortality we are witnessing is the use of the very active systemic insecticides called neonicotinoids. A previously unknown and harmful effect of neonicotinoids has been identified by researchers. They discovered that neonicotinoids in low and field-relevant concentrations reduce the concentration of acetylcholine in the royal jelly/larval food secreted by nurse bees.
  7. Beach replenishment helps protect against storm erosion during El NiƱo
    A comparison of recent and previous nourishments of San Diego beaches suggests that a larger sand grain size improved nourishment performance.
  8. Tiny algae ideal for sniffing out nutrient pollution in water
    Tiny algae, called diatoms, living in water could be key to providing a definitive and clear measure of whether streams, rivers and lakes have damaging levels of nutrients in them.
  9. Researchers offer new theory on how climate affects violence
    Researchers have long struggled to explain why some violent crime rates are higher near the equator than other parts of the world. Now, a team of researchers has developed a model that could help explain why.
  10. 'Flower Power': Photovoltaic cells replicate rose petals
    With a surface resembling that of plants, solar cells improve light-harvesting and thus generate more power. Scientists reproduced the epidermal cells of rose petals that have particularly good antireflection properties and integrated the transparent replicas into an organic solar cell. This resulted in a relative efficiency gain of twelve percent.